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Total Daily Entries found: 518
Entries below from Page #2 of 104 : From  6 - 10 
(To search the Summary for an overview of the nursery orphans from each month click here)
 

Date

Entry

6/19/2018 

Shukuru getting on very well and has settled down nicely to the Umani Stockades. She has a lot of nice food here in the forests and most seem to be her favourites. She eats nicely and finishes all her food inside her room at night; in the morning the keepers find hardly anything to clean up but just a few twigs. We hope Shukuru will now start to get better and better as she has already shown signs of improvement. Sonje and Lima Lima are taking great care of her and stop the bullying boys from getting too close to her or pushing her around, because she is still weak in comparison to them. Alamaya and Ngasha still give her a hard time, following her around and trying to hold her tail, pushing her or trying to climb on her back, but Sonje remains steadfast in keeping Shukuru out of harms way, and Lima Lima too. 

Shukuru following her trusted keeper


Mwashoti following Murera


Shukuru loving all the vegetation

6/17/2018 

At the mud bath today, Shukuru seemed stronger, suggesting that the environment at Umani is favourable to her. She runs like Lima Lima and Alamaya when arriving for their bottles and even demanded more bottles after she had her two. She went very far inside the forest today but the keepers kept a close eye on her so as not to lost her in the thick bushes. She was delighted with the variety of the food and the soft branches, and she came back in the evening with a very full belly!
She looked stronger and more energetic than she arrived, and Lima Lima still follows her closely. We hope she will be a good friend. Alamaya is acting like a bit of a bully but it is just because he feels jealous because Shukuru is getting more attention, and from his special friend Lima Lima as well, who is now monitoring Shukuru. When the keepers catch Alamaya trying to charge and push Shukuru aside they always tell him off.
 

Sonje with Shukuru


Mwashoti crossing the road with Murera behind


Zongoloni looking after Shukuru

6/16/2018 

In the early morning the elephants had their milk bottles as usual but in the open area in preparation for Shukuru’s arrival. Just as it reached the time when the elephants would usually walk into the forest, the lorry carrying Shukuru arrived and the orphans walked over very excited to greet her. Lima Lima performed her role perfectly and was the first one over to welcome her out. She touched Shukuru with her trunk, but Shukuru came out of the lorry looking very confused and a bit tired. She was not interested in her milk bottle, but grabbed pellets as she was followed by Alamaya, Mwashoti and Lima Lima playing her role as assistant head girl. She escorted Shukuru to all the new places to familiarize her with Umani stockades and the Kibwezi forest. Shukuru was so delighted with all the new and delicious vegetation around, grabbing as much grass as she could fit into her mouth at once – this immediately helped to settle her down, as she was fixated on the food.

When Shukuru and other orphans came back to the stockades after a long day’s walk, Shukuru was led by her keeper friend who came with her from the nursery because she did not know any of the Umani keepers. She lost her way on the way to her night stockade, as she was still not sure which her room was. She was next to Alamaya, and Alamaya was trying to bully her while in his room but the keepers stopped him and she had a peaceful night. We are sure that in the forest of Kibwezi Shukuru will get very strong and gain condition in no time after her long time of illness.
 

Shukuru arriving


Shukuru being introduced to Umani


Shukuru out with the other orphans

6/15/2018 

Good news arrived for the keepers today that soon we would receive the new girl Shukuru from the Nairobi Nursery. She would arrive at Umani tomorrow, so the keepers immediately set about the preparations for her imminent arrival. The keepers told their elephant charges that soon they would have a new sister, one that Murera and Sonje would remember too, but we knew they did not know what we meant. The keepers were extremely happy to receive the new young girl to their elephant family. Perhaps this would mean that Murera and Sonje might think more about rejoining the wild too, if Shukuru was around to look after the young boys Mwashoti and Alamaya, but they would have to see. Perhaps Murera and Sonje are just too attached to the young boys.  

Jasiri charging at monkeys


Zongoloni leading


Ngasha looking where to browse next

6/13/2018 

All the elephants came back to their night stockades looking tired after a long day of walking out in the forests. Murera and Sonje were limping along after the long day out and we knew they were tired.

In their rooms Alamaya found Mwashoti stealing some of his branches and a fight ensued between the little boys between the posts of their stockades. It was unbelievable to see how hard Alamaya pushed back on the wall posts, and Mwashoti was lucky that Alamaya could not reach him no matter how hard he pushed. Eventually the keepers had to come and calm Alamaya down by giving him some lucerne pellets on the ground. This distracted him and he stopped pushing on the partition wall between him and Mwashoti. Sonje also wanted Alamaya to stop pushing against his wall but was too far away, so she rumbled to Lima Lima to stop Alamaya from misbehaving. At the end of the day everyone including Alamaya knows that they both steal the green from each other’s side, not just Mwashoti, so Alamaya needed to calm down!
 

Sonje picking her favourite branches


Quanza and Faraja walking along the road


Alamaya and Murera

 

 

 

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