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Total Daily Entries found: 471
Entries below from Page #2 of 95 : From  6 - 10 
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Date

Entry

11/30/2017 

Layoni and Dabassa arrived at the stockades early this morning and after the supplement feeding was over they joined the stockade dependant orphan elephants in some games around the stockade compound. Layoni and Dabassa joined forces to challenge Panda in a wrestling match.

When it was time to head to the browsing fields Panda tried to catch up with Tahri to spend some time with her but was prevented from doing so but the two boys who wanted to engage her in strength testing and pushing games. Araba became a little jealous of the new comer and kept pushing her away. Mudanda and Ndii came to the rescue and kept Tahri close to them. Panda kept trying to get close to Tahri as well so that they could all browse together.

The orphan elephants visited the baobab water hole where Ndii left Araba to her own devices while she enjoyed a mud bath and scratching session with Tahri. The afternoons browsing activities took place at the baobab water hole before ending at the big water hole.
 

Panda embracing Tahri


Araba pushing Tahri


Naipoki following Thari


Ndii embracing Tahri

11/28/2017 

It was a nice beginning of the day with the stockade dependant orphan elephants playing happily around the stockade compound leaving when Dabassa and Layoni made their grand entry into the compound.

The orphans went half way up the eastern side of Msinga Hill where they settled for the mornings browsing activities. When it was time for the mud bath and afternoon milk feed the orphans descended and had a lovely time wallowing in the water following the milk and dairy cube feeding. Mbirikani and Ishaq-B ran in and out of water in what was perceived to be some kind of competition. Ajali seemed to like their game and joined in, even though he is not usually a fan of the water.

After a wonderful noon mud bath, Mbirikani and Tundani went for a scratching session against a big tree trunk while Kenia and Arruba waited to have a turn when they were done. The rest of the browsing day was spent browsing peacefully with Bada and Mudanda taking the lead of the orphan herd in the evening when it was time to return to the stockades.
 

Ishaq-B having a lovely mudbath


Mbirikani mudbathing


Tundani scratching


Ajali and Nguvu browsing together

11/27/2017 

This morning Dabassa and Layoni missed seeing the orphans as they arrived at the stockades after the juniors had left for the field. The two later went to look for their younger friends but headed to the wrong waterhole thus not managing to meet up with them.

Ndii, Kenia and Ishaq-B were all enjoying close browsing ties with their darling Araba throughout the day. The orphans visited the baobab water hole at noon where they had a lot of fun playing mud bathing games before moving resuming their browsing activities.

In the evening, when the orphans returned to the safety of the stockades for the night, Embu, Rorogoi, Suswa, Arruba and Bada were brought into Tahri's big stockade so that they could socialize and get to know each other in preparation of her joining them in the fields. Arruba and Embu were quick to embrace their new friend while Suswa, Rorogoi and Bada showed little interest in her.
 

Lovely Ishaq-B


Araba being followed by Ndii


Suswa scratching


Tahri in the stocakde

11/25/2017 

Once the mornings stockade activities were over the orphans headed to the park leaving Dabassa and Layoni enjoying the remains of the sweet dairy cubes from the cement feeding trough. Once out in the fields the orphans scattered and enjoyed browsing on the green grass shooting up after the last rain storm.

It was a very hot day and the orphans sought shelter under a short but green acacia tree. Bada and Rorogoi, who were leading the group, were scared off by the blowing sound of a big monitor lizard that was in the top of that tree. The monitor lizard was simply afraid of all the orphans and wanted to warn them that he was there. Nevertheless the orphans moved away from the tree and made their way to the baobab waterhole where they had a wonderful mud bath.

Embu, using her tusks, poked at the red earth piles to loosen them up so that she could have a dustbath, as they had hardened following the recent rains. The rest of the days browsing activities took place close to the waterhole with Mudanda and Lentili enjoying a lead of the orphan herd to the stockades in the evening.
 

Rorogoi in the browsing fields


Bada enjoying the mudbath


Arruba browsing


Embu poking the earth pile with her tusks

11/24/2017 

It was a wonderful beginning to the day with the stockade dependant orphan elephants welcoming Dabassa and Layoni for some range cubes feeding before leaving the two at the stockade compound when they left for the browsing grounds. At the dairy cubes feeding area, Embu had some very close feeding contact with Dabassa, while the rest of the juniors kept a respectful distance from the two Ex Orphans.

While out in the browsing fields Ndii picked up a dry stick and put it in her mouth using it to prod Panda and Nguvu to get them to move away from her loved one Araba. Panda and Nguvu did not really have any interest in getting in a fight with Ndii and were happy to move away.

The orphans went to the milk feeding area in groups of five where they downed an afternoon milk bottle before entering the mud bath where they had lovely time wallowing and playing mud bath games. The orphans spent the afternoon browsing on the Western foot of Msinga Hill where they enjoyed feeding on fresh green grass.
 

Embu coming to the mudbath


Dabassa at mudbath


Ndii feasting on a root

 

 

 

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