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Total Daily Entries found: 362
Entries below from Page #2 of 73 : From  6 - 10 
(To search the Summary for an overview of the nursery orphans from each month click here)
 

Date

Entry

8/30/2017 

Karisa and Shukuru left the stockade with branches in their mouths that they continued to chew on as they waited for the lucerne to be distributed. Tusuja and Galla entwined their trunks in morning greetings as Oltaiyoni walked down to the water trough and briefly joined a wild bull to drinking water. The rest of her friends joined her after feeding on lucerne.

Out in the bush, Olsekki and Boromoko engaged each other in strength testing exercise while Kamok found a suitable rock that she used to scratch her buttocks on. Tusuja took a break from feeding and relaxed under a tree for some time before resuming browsing. Oltaiyoni led the way to the mud bath where only four wild bulls showed up. Sirimon played with Kamok as Olsekki and Lemoyian enjoyed riding on their friends while they wallowed in the water. After wallowing, the orphans briefly settled for red soil dusting and then went back out into the shrubs to browse again. In the evening, as the keepers gathered the orphans to take them back to the stockade, Garzi, Barsilinga, Karisa and Wanjala were missing. The keepers tracked down Garzi and Barsilinga but without Wanjala and Karisa. At last they found them completely at ease browsing along the Kalovoto seasonal River and herded them back to the stockade.
 

Shukuru coming out with a branch in her mouth


Oltaiyoni and a wild bull drinking


Kinna Kama and Tusuja


Olsekki playing with Boromoko

8/25/2017 

Six wild bulls were drinking water at the stockade water troughs when the orphans were let out early in the morning. As usual, they settled to eat their supplement lucerne. A while later, Galla had a disagreement with Karisa when Karisa tried to stretch his trunk to share the lucerne that Galla was feeding on. The disagreement ended in a fight where Galla pushed Karisa away. Dupotto settled to share her lucerne with Oltaiyoni as Chaimu, Kilaguni and Kasigau joined the juniors to feed on lucerne. When the orphans were through, Laragai led the way to the water trough where the orphans armed themselves with enough water that would take them through the entire morning.

Boromoko engaged Tusuja in a pushing game, a game that ended soon when Boromoko attempted to ride on Tusuja. The orphans concentrated on browsing up to eleven o'clock in the morning when Tusuja led the first group to mud bath. Twenty six wild bulls attended the mud bath and only showed up when the orphans were winding up the mud bath activities. Kamok relaxed under the nearby tree before following her friends. Galla spent some time in a soil dusting exercise while Boromoko engaged Lemoyian in a pushing game that ended in a draw. In the evening, the orphans passed by the mud bath again before returning back to the stockades for the evening.
 

Galla chasing Karisa


Chaimu in the compound


Karisa leading the way


Kamok relaxing


Boromoko playing with Lemoyian

8/23/2017 

The orphans were joined by the senior Ex Orphans in the morning. Yetu, who no longer accompanies her mother Yatta these days, was busy shielding Kama from playing with the orphans. Later Kama managed to free herself of Yetu and went to play with Sokotei, Oltaiyoni and Naseku. An hour later, the orphans left to go and browse, leaving the Ex Orphans still at the stockade compound.

Ukame settled to browse with Naseku while Dupotto settled to feed with her friend Kamok. At mud bath, the sun was hot prompting all the orphans to have a cooling mud bath. Twenty six wild bulls attended mud bath in the company of Tomboi and Buchuma. Barsilinga had a brief chat with Buchuma before heading back to the browsing field. Karisa, Shukuru, Naseku and Dupotto took decided to relax under a tree for a bit. They later resumed browsing when the temperatures dropped and it was a bit cooler. Galla settled to browse with Siangiki and in the evening on the way back to the stockade, the orphans passed by the mud bath again where they participated in an evening wallowing.
 

Kinna and baby Kama with the orphans


Kama playing next to Yetu


Naseku and Kama


Dupotto and Kamok scratching their chins

8/22/2017 

The orphans were joined by Mutara’s group and a wild bull in the morning. Soon after sharing lucerne, the orphans headed towards Kone area where they settled to browse. Boromoko started the day’s activities by engaging Olsekki in a pushing game that ended in a draw. Ukame, Karisa, Dupotto and Kamok took a break from feeding to participate in a soil dusting exercise. Shortly later, the orphans were joined by Olare’s group. Garzi and Kithaka ganged up against Chemi Chemi but Kandecha, who was feeding close by, came to Chemi Chemi's rescue by pushing Garzi and Kithaka away. Karisa settled to feed close to Tumaren while Oltaiyoni teamed up with Melia and Kalama. At mud bath time, the orphans were joined by twenty wild bulls.

Soon after they were done wallowing in the mud, Shukuru led the way back to the browsing field. The weather was chilly and the orphans concentrated on browsing throughout the afternoon without any major observation.
 

Enkikwe playing with Sirimon


Barsilinga playing with Kithaka


Naseku soil bathing

8/16/2017 

The orphans left the stockade in a jovial mood today. Soon after settling on fresh lucerne, several Ex Orphans joined them to feed. A wild herd consisting of twelve members reported for water. The wild orphan who was amongst the Ex Orphans, tried to scare the keepers by mock changing at them. When she realised that the keepers were totally unconcerned with her, she started a lone game of rolling on the ground. Later, Ukame led the way to the browsing field. Dupotto as usual settled to browse with Kamok while Boromoko took some time off from feeding to participate in a soil dusting exercise.

At around ten thirty in morning, something strange happened. A wild herd in the company of Galana Gawa, Ithumbah, Kilaguni and Zurura passed by where the orphans were feeding. The herd didn't stay for long but continued with their journey, leaving Zurura and another young elephant with the orphans. What drew the keepers’ attention was excitement of the orphans as they circled around this young elephant and amazingly enough that baby started walking towards mud bath as the orphans followed. It's then the keepers moved to find out who the baby was because at first they had mistaken him for Tusuja. They called out Karisa and the baby seemed to remember that name. He walked to the keepers as he raised his trunk and suckled a finger of one keepers. Karisa has come back after two months and twenty nine days in the wilderness!!! Now he joins Dupotto who was rescued again after going missing for two and half months. It remains to be seen if Kelelari will find his way back just as Karisa has done. At mud bath time, Karisa drank his first milk happily and ended up having 2 more bottles. Karisa then walked with Laragai to the water trough where they joined wild bulls to drink. When the bulls started leaving, Karisa followed them but the keepers were quick enough to bring him back. After mud bath, Shukuru, Ukame, Naseku, Kithaka, Oltaiyoni and Wanjala settled for red soil dusting as Lemoyian had a strength testing exercise with Boromoko. In the afternoon, the orphans settled to browse in the Kone area where Karisa settled to browse with Wanjala, Galla and Dupotto. Later in the evening, Karisa returned to the stockade with the other orphans. He is looking very good and healthy and seems to happy to be back with his old Nursery friends.
 

Karisa walking in with the Ex Orphans


Orphans all sniffing Karisa


Dupotto Karisa and Roi


Karisa at mud bath looking so good

 

 

 

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