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Total Daily Entries found: 150
Entries below from Page #2 of 31 : From  6 - 10 
(To search the Summary for an overview of the nursery orphans from each month click here)
 

Date

Entry

5/3/2018 

Poor Enkesha is having a bit of trouble with her trunk these days as she has a little wound on one side of her partially closed wound from the snare. She is very restless as it obviously very itchy and annoying and she blows out of it very hard to relieve the itching and is always seen putting it in mud and water to relieve the itching. This detracts from her time browsing as well. We gave her a few injections to help treat the wounded area as well as smearing anti-itch cream onto the site to help relieve it a little. Her distress means that little Tagwa has been extra caring towards her and is often seen placing her trunk on Enkesha’s back in sympathy. We will keep an eye on her trunk and do all we can to relieve her of discomfort. 

Enkesha experiencing discomfort from her wound


Ambo with a browsing buddy


Tagwa and Mundusi browsing

5/2/2018 

As the orphans settled to browse out in the grassy field area this morning, Ndiwa, Ndotto, Sagala, Mteto, Mundusi and Lasayen came across a lone male buffalo that was busy grazing in the tall grass which almost fully covered it! It was only partially visible. It movement in the tall grass frightened Ndiwa and Sagala who were leading the group. They turned back yelling which prompted Ndotto, Lasayen and Mundusi to run as well, bumping and crashing into each other as they ran through the tall grass with no one wanting to be left behind. Their bumping caused poor Sagala to slip and fall over as the ground was very muddy. She rolled several times before landing up in a thicket which supported her and helped her stand again. When she got up she looked a bit confused and accidentally starting ran back towards the direction she had come from! The keepers tried calling her but she was already running fast. When she stopped she started yelling and trumpeting for her friends, which Mbegu, Godoma, Tagwa, Malkia and Sana Sana responded to by running in her direction and trumpeting as well, and then helped her reunite with the group again. Such a lot of fuss over one lone buffalo grazing in the grass! 

Ndotto and Sagala before the Buffalo incident


Lasayen browsing


Godoma running towards Sagala

4/28/2018 

Tagwa and Malkia look to be forming a nice friendship. They spend quite a lot of time together and where we find one, the other is never far behind. Today they spent most of the day together and away from the others as well.
Mbegu and Ndotto seem to have quite a deep level of respect for each other. They have been browsing together over the past few days as well. Ndotto normally likes to browse further away but Mbegu likes to stay with the little ones. Sattao is very attached to Mbegu and will never stray very far from her. Today all three of them disappeared from the main group only to be found some time later quite a distance from the group, browsing along the stream inside the forest.
Ngilai has always known to play rough but these days he is getting a little cocky as well. If you insist on telling him to move or back away from doing something naughty he raises his ears up and holds his head high, which is a sign of defiance! Boys will always be boys!
 

Tagwa, Jotto, Murit and Maktao


Tagwa leading the others


Ngilai in a naughty mood

4/21/2018 

Out in the bush it is very green and lush, and muddy too, giving the orphans a lovely environment to walk around in. They were walking around browsing this morning and some were playing too, rolling around in the wet sludgy mud. After their 9am milk feed, Maisha, Kiasa, Maktao, Musiara, Tamiyoi and Malima were spotted enjoying a very fun game running about the bushes and crossing back and forth a little stream, splashing the water with their trunks and legs and having a lot of fun. They were very excitable and eventually poor little Maktao slipped as his legs splayed out to either side in the slippery mud. He obviously cried out and this made the others run away. Mbegu, Godoma and Tagwa came running over to make sure he was okay, but they found him already standing up. They surrounded him and patted him all over with their trunks just to make sure he was okay.  

Orphans walking out where it was nice and muddy


Malima was in a happy mood


Malima browsing

4/18/2018 

Tagwa, Sagala, Ndiwa and Malkia had a plan to join the first group at the public visiting time that, unfortunately for them, was nipped in the bud! They were spotted by the keepers at the mud bath while they were still some distance away. Although they had managed to sneak away from the keepers in the forest, they had been spotted early by the ones near the mud bath. It was very hard for the keepers to turn Tagwa and Malkia away as they fought hard to be allowed access to the visiting area. They yelled loudly and complained that they wanted to join Godoma’s group. Ndiwa and Sagala knew immediately they had been naughty and complied immediately; they turned and ran back to the forest as soon as they saw the keepers coming towards them. All the shouting from Tagwa and Malkia made those enjoying the mud bath like Godoma, Kuishi, Malima, Jotto and Mapia also start shouting as they were scared, but they were not entirely sure of what! The little ones Maktao, Musiara, Sattao and Enkesha surrounded their keepers for safety. The keepers had their work cut out to reassure everyone that nothing was wrong and it was just the other two naughty orphans causing all the trouble for no reason; soon all the orphans went back to what they were doing, and Tagwa and Malkia had their milk bottles! 

Mteto happy and browsing


Ndiwa loves to sneak off


Godoma wants more milk

 

 

 

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