The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: SIRIMON  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 SIRIMON  Male  Wednesday, October 9, 2013 Marania Farm  1 year old  Found on Marania farm after slipping through the electric fence  Poaching 

Latest Updates on SIRIMON:

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Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for SIRIMON)

1/25/2018 - On their night adventures, Laragai and her group came across Tumaren, Melia, Olare, Kitirua, Naisula, Kalama, Chemi Chemi, Chaimu, a wild orphan and Kilaguni. Shortly before dawn, the group walked back to the stockade compound where they decided to take a little nap before being joined by the juniors. Boromoko and Sirimon checked in later in the company of a wild bull. The wild bull settled for water as Sirimon stretched his trunk to the bulls mouth, enquiring which way they would go after drinking water. Sirimon and Boromoko, who have become good friends lately, are learning how to be big boys. Their friendship has been reinforced since they were the last to join Laragaiís independent group, and it appears that there is something they don't like about the group. Time will tell what it is that is bothering them! The bull left soon after drinking enough water and advised Sirimon that he was still young to go out with him, but from time to time he will be popping back to give him one or two lessons.

When the juniors were out Galla, who is growing fast, settled for a chat with Boromoko as he tried to find out what were his feelings were, given that he always spends the night out. The gentle Boromoko gave his answers as he took Galla into a series of pushing tactics that he would be using to attack his fellow boys. It appeared that Galla was enjoying the lessons and games and when the time comes, we think he would certainly love to join Boromoko in the wild. Later Galla tried to put into practice what he had learned from Boromoko on Tusuja, and attempted to climb on him. Tusuja didn't like it and turned to face Galla to see what his problem was. Galla stood his ground which seemed to inform Tusuja that he should watch this space and he was trying hard to be the most dominant male! The quiet Dupotto who keeps to herself and who never likes to be pushed settled for a soil dusting exercise, while the independent Sapalan settled in the valley enjoying a great variety of vegetation. On the way to the mud bath, the keepers realized that Sapalan was missing from the group. A search was quickly mounted and to the keeperís surprise, he was still browsing in the valley, very unconcerned about what was going on around him. Sapalan weaned himself off milk the second day after arriving in Ithumba. So to him, nothing is special and he is giving signs that he can be on his own and he can survive without any problem. Later, it was realized that a short distance away four bulls were communicating with Sapalan, assuring him that all is well and if he wanted to he could join them too. It's only a matter of time before we think Sapalan will bid goodbye to the stockade life. Karisa used to behave the same way as Sapalan, but the only difference is that Karisa is still drinking. At the moment he has calmed down a lot, unlike before when he wanted to run off into the bush all the time. It was not long ago when Karisa ran off with Dupotto and Kelelari for close to three months! Karisa turned up in a group of Ex Orphans and rejoined the milk dependent group several metres from where he took off for his foray in the wild.

The Two Latest Photos of SIRIMON: (view gallery of pictures for SIRIMON)

 Sirimon out in the bush Sirimon in the bush with the other nursery orphans
Sirimon out in the bush
photo taken on 10/22/2014
Sirimon in the bush with the other nursery orphans
photo taken on 10/22/2014

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: SIRIMON (foster now)


The 3rd week in October was turning out to be a busy one at The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. Hot on the heels of the rescue of little Wass and his two baby ostrich friends on the 15th October another call was received by the Trust on the 16th about a baby elephant in the Mount Kenya region. This baby was about 1 year old and was found wandering in the fields of Marania Farm close to the Mount Kenya elephant corridor.

The Mount Kenya wildlife corridor lies across Kisima and Marania Farms and has been a huge success, essentially re-linking the elephant populations of Samburu and Lakipia. Elephants that were once free to roam between habitats, but can no longer do so because of fencing and increased human development, can cause a huge amount of damage creating conflict with local communities therefore threatening their own survival. The electric fences of the Mount Kenya elephant corridor protect local communities from marauding elephants whilst enabling the elephants to migrate between two very diverse habitats in search of food, minerals and mates, and the Mount Kenya habitat provides a much needed dry season range for elephants . The corridor is approximately 14km long and opened in 2011. Initial worries that the elephants would be unwilling to use an underpass to cross the busy highway, linking Northern Kenya to the rest of the country, proved unfounded with the first elephant making the traverse within a month of opening. Hundreds of elephants were to follow in the subsequent months.

Getting ready to go for the rescue  The orphaned calf arrives and is met by the rescue team

Preparing the calf for the flight  The calf is strapped and ready to be loaded on the plane

About to load the calf into the rescue plane


The baby elephant that was found on Marania Farm was thought to have slipped between the electric fences which prevent the large adult elephants from entering the fields. It seems likely that his mother was killed by poachers as three weeks earlier a carcass of a lactating female elephant was found with its tusks removed. The calf probably managed to stay with the herd for a while, possibly managing to scrounge some milk from another mother as his condition is fairly good, before becoming separated. The herd was nowhere to be seen when the baby was finally spotted by the Marania scouts. The scouts alerted Lewa Wildlife Conservancy who in turn notified the Kenya Wildlife Service and the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.
Immediately after DWST was notified about the baby a rescue plane and team was arranged to fly to Lewa airstrip to meet up with Dr. Mutinda, a KWS vet, and his ground team.

On the way home  In the pickup at Wilson

The calf loaded into the pickup at Wilson  The calf is placed in the stockade on arrival


Dr. Mutinda chose to anaesthetize the baby elephant and it was then transported by vehicle to Lewa airstrip where the KWS ground team met up with the DSWT rescue team. Once the elephant calf was loaded onto the aircraft and safely secured he was revived to ensure that he did not remain under anaesthetic for too long as this is never advisable with baby elephants.

Sirimon in the stockade  Sirimon a couple of days after rescue

Sirimon enjoying greens

The calf arrived at the Nairobi Nursery after dark and thankfully still looked in good condition. Amazingly he began to drink milk from a bottle that night and was clearly extremely ravenous. He tamed down quickly and it was only a few days before he was able to join the other orphans and assimilate into the Nursery group. We have called him Sirimon a fitting Mount Kenya name.

Sirimon out in the bush  Sirimon with the others

Sirimon in the bush with the other nursery orphans

   

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