The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: ROI  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 ROI  Female  Friday, December 27, 2013 Olare Orok Conservancy - Maasai Mara  10 months  Found next to her dead mother in the company of the rest of her herd  Poaching 

Latest Updates on ROI:

View to Location map for ROI (opens a new window)

Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for ROI)

6/30/2018 - It was a quiet morning with a clear sky when the orphans were let out. No single wild elephant or former orphans showed up that morning. Namalok settled for a scratching game on the nearby rocks, a game that also attracted Rapa, Kauro, Esampu and Roi. As soon as the orphans had enough lucerne, Maramoja, who has all the characteristics of becoming a future matriarch, rumbled as she walked out southwards. This was a sign of letting everyone know that it was time to head for browsing before it got too hot.

Out in the field, the orphans were joined by Orwa and Bomani who were wondering when the time will come for Laragai and her small group to join them out in the wild so that they might have some company and grow their herd. Galla seized the opportunity to have a strength testing exercise with Bomani. Their game didn't last for long as Orwa warned them by taking too much time playing it would cost them time feeding, and they needed to get enough food to eat.

At mud bath time, the orphans had a spectacular wallowing session and later, Siangiki and Olsekki took their friend Enkikwe to drink water and thereafter escorted him slowly back out to browse. Galla developed an itchy chest and looking around he couldn't find a suitable rock or tree to serve him. He then picked a stick that he used to scratch himself with, and when he was satisfied he went back to browsing. Kauro and Wanjala settled under a tree to relax and when they got bored of standing under the tree, the two boys decided to keep themselves busy by scratching against the tree as they waited for the temperatures to drop. Kamok and Roi, who came together from Nairobi, embraced the spirit of sharing when they teamed up to feed on the same shrub. Maramoja spend time feeding with Esampu as Mundusi always sticks with his friend good friend Mteto. In the evening, four wild bulls in the company of the senior ex-orphans showed up at the stockade and left immediately after having enough water.

The Two Latest Photos of ROI: (view gallery of pictures for ROI)

 Roi having a drink at mudbath Roi at the mudbath
Roi having a drink at mudbath
photo taken on 11/24/2014
Roi at the mudbath
photo taken on 11/24/2014

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: ROI (foster now)


On the 22nd October Richard Roberts from the Mara Elephant Project contacted us about the plight of a young milk dependent calf, approximately 10 months old, whose mother had been found dead on the plains of the Masai Mara that day. Closer inspection of the dead mother revealed that she had been poached and died from a poisoned spear wound on her cheek. She had been photographed by a visitor happily feeding with her little baby underfoot, both alive and well.


The calf under its mother  Mother and Child

The next day the tragedy unfolded and the same visitor found a very different scenario with the baby confused by her dead mothers side, but in the company of the rest of the herd, trying to come to terms with it all. The little calf was then whisked away by the rest of the herd but not before she had said her painful goodbyes to her lifeless mother. As a milk dependent baby she would have little hope of survival without being rescued as a lactating mother in the herd would never have enough milk to satiate two calves. The tragedy was reported to the Mara Elephant Project and KWS. Everyone realized that her young milk dependent calf had little hope of survival without her Mum and that she needed to be rescued before the herd travelled great distances with her, possibly into Tanzania where the hope of any rescue would be lost forever. The baby without sufficient milk would only get weaker and weaker and eventually be unable to keep up with the herd, and be left behind.

The herd mourning the death of the calf's mother  The young calf mourning her mother

The young orphaned calf  The calf with one of the members of the herd

The young calf with the Matriarchs baby  The young calf with her herd

Coordinating together with the DSWT elephant Keeper rescue team who had by now landed at Olare Orok airstrip Richard Roberts of MEP had the unenviable fraught task of separating this baby from the herd before she was spirited away and lost. With careful manoeuvering the calf was separated by vehicle in order to enable the DSWT Keepers to quickly leap from the moving land cruiser and restrain the baby. This took some planning as the matriarch was extremely protective of the young orphaned baby. What had been observed in the meantime was when the orphaned calf tried to suckle her (She had her own calf a little older than the orphaned baby so was lactating) she would push her away, not prepared to share her milk and deprive her own baby. The separation was done extremely effectively by the DSWT, so experienced in restraining elephants, and with so many others from the MEP prepared to jump in and help. The little calf was wrapped and strapped and prepared for her flight to Nairobi, while the rest of the team from the MEP together with the DSWT funded Mara Mobile Veterinary Unit headed by KWS Veterinary Officer Dr. Limo went to do an autopsy on the dead mother to absolutely confirm her cause of death. Her tusks in the meantime had been removed by the authorities.

Keepers waiting to fly out  In the Mara

The Mobile Vet Unit  The calf is captured

Restraining the calf  The calf on the way to the airstrip

Preparing to load the calf into the plane  The calf is loaded

Wrapped, Strapped and ready for the flight  The rescue plane and the rescue team

We named the little girl Roi and she was watched and cared for closely throughout the flight by the DSWT Keepers and given some tranquilizer to take the edge off what had been an extremely traumatic and heartbreaking day for her. She finally arrived at the DSWT Nursery in Nairobi National Park after dark. She was a very robust baby from the outset not having been without motherís milk for long, and thankfully very soon took to the bottle which made things simpler. She was confined to a stockade for a couple of days but remained aggressive and clearly agitated when the others left her orbit for the day out in the Park. We made the decision to let her out despite her not having tamed down as much as we would ideally like and this made all the difference. She was immediately comfortable and content amidst the older orphans who paid her attention and provided her with the elephant love and affection she craved and missed. She was hooked on her milk bottle so continued to gravitate towards the Keepers for her three hourly feeds.

En route back to Nairobi  Arrived at Wilson

Off loading the calf at Wilson  In the pickup

Arrival at the Nursery  The young calf in the stockade

The young apprehensive calf  The calf is called Roi

Roi out and being greeted by the rest of the orphans  Roi in the bush

Roi browsing

As the days have passed little Roi has settled in completely and is now extremely attached to her Keepers, familiar with the routine and is playing once more and she appears to be genuinely happy.

Roi at the mudbath  Out and about with the rest

Roi having a drink at mudbath  Sweet Roi

   

Please see the resources above for more information on ROI

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