The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: LASAYEN  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 LASAYEN  Male  Tuesday, August 26, 2014 Namunyak Conservancy - Northern Kenya  One month  Found fallen down a community dug well   Well Victim 

Latest Updates on LASAYEN:

View to Location map for LASAYEN (opens a new window)

Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for LASAYEN)

9/23/2017 - All the orphans were in a good mood this morning and headed out to the forest trumpeting and racing to see who could get to the grassy plain first. No one wanted to be last! Even Mbegu, Kauro and Ndotto, who normally stay at the back of the group making sure no one was left behind, were eager to be first and were shoving the little ones into the front. Pare, Lasayen and Rapa then engaged one another in a lengthy wrestling game whilst Godoma, Esampu, Sana Sana and Ndotto were having a lot of fun rolling in the long grass and sliding on each other. It was the first time Mundusi, Mteto and Ndiwa had visited this area of the Park and they were very busy exploring and enjoying the new vegetation they found. When it was time to leave the field for their 9am bottle feed, Maramoja, Malkia, Luggard and Tagwa didnít want to leave. It was only once they realized they had been left behind that they decided to start running and trumpeting to catch up with the group.
A 3 week old baby was later rescued from the Mara in the evening and has been named Pili.

The Two Latest Photos of LASAYEN: (view gallery of pictures for LASAYEN)

 Lasayen having some milk Sweet Lasayen
Lasayen having some milk
photo taken on 12/19/2014
Sweet Lasayen
photo taken on 12/19/2014

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: LASAYEN (foster now)


On the 25th of September a tiny calf was retrieved from a well on the Namunyak conservancy in Samburu by the community rangers. He had obviously fallen down this community dug well meant specifically for livestock but so often frequented by the thirsty elephant herds under the cover of darkness in the dry season months. Little elephant calves at this time become increasingly vulnerable and slip in. Because of the human presence the elephant herds disappear at daybreak to avoid human wildlife conflict and in this case are faced with the simply heartbreaking decision of walking away from their forsaken calf.



Fortunately for the baby the community alerted the security rangers of the area when they were confronted by this stranded baby elephant who were able to retrieve him from the well. The decision was made by the management of the area to keep the calf overnight and try to reintroduce him to a herd in an effort to reunite him with his family.

Keepers waiting on the airstrip for the calf to arrive  Some of the calf's rescuers

The calf and its rescuers  The orphaned calf meets a keeper

The calf arrives at the Nairobi nursery

This did not work sadly and the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust was alerted the following day, 26th of September, by the Kenya Wildlife Service about his plight and a rescue was requested. A DSWT team of experienced Keepers flew into the Namunyak airstrip and retrieved the tiny baby. He was by this stage very dehydrated, as it had been a significant amount of time by now without milk. He was expertly restrained for the flight back to Nairobi and an IV drip put in place for the duration of the flight. On arrival at the Nursery the little baby was placed into a freshly prepared stable and given milk, which he took greedily. We called him Lasayen, a beautiful name from the area, a sacred mountain name for the Samburu.

Lasayen in the park with the other orphans  Lasayen

Ndotto and Lasayen  Ndotto and Lasayen with a keeper

Lasayen was teething when he came into the Nursery fold, which would suggest he was around about a month old when he so tragically lost his elephant family. This is a fraught time, and we loose so many babies during teething as their condition deteriorates and sometimes to the point of being irretrievable. Fragile calves so often succumb during this incredibly stressful time, a time that can span a few months, sometimes even three months. Lasayen definitely struggled which is quite normal, we have had over the span of many years seen few that donít, but thankfully he then began to pick up when his teeth were finally all out, and his energy level improved, as did his body condition.

Lasayen and a keeper in Shuka  Lasayen and Ndotto

Lasayen with a keeper  Lasayen having some milk

Lasayen surrounded by greenery in the park

He is full of character and loved by all and of course the nurturing older orphans particularly. He has settled well and is genuinely happy and hooked on his many elephant friends and his beloved Keepers too.

Sweet Lasayen  Ndotto and Lasayen having milk

The keeers and babies in colourful Shuka

   

Please see the resources above for more information on LASAYEN

| View the Orphan History List Foster LASAYEN | Print this Profile |

Share this:
Follow us:

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust   P.O. Box 15555 Nairobi Kenya

Copyright © 1999-2017, The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. All Rights Reserved. | Privacy Policy