The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: GODOMA  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 GODOMA  Female  Saturday, February 14, 2015 Taita Hills Sanctuary  5-6 months  Found bruised and battered in a well by Conservancy Scouts from the Taita Hills Sanctuary  Well Victim 

Latest Updates on GODOMA:

View to Location map for GODOMA (opens a new window)

Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for GODOMA)

7/28/2018 - It was a wonderful beginning to the day with the stockade dependent orphan elephants playing around the stockade compound soon after the milk and supplement feeding was over. Mudanda enjoyed a scratching session on a small rock while Nelion watched from a distance as it was his favourite scratching spot. Ngilai took Ndotto to task over a head-butting encounter before joining their friends who were moving towards the browsing grounds.

On the foot of Msinga Hill, Araba went to scratch against a very big rock where she was joined by Bada who waited his turn. Suswa had a scratching session against a tree and when she was the spot was taken over by Nelion. Godoma rested her foot on a small flat rock, as if she was about to walk on three legs, surprising Ndotto who was fixated on watching her and forgot to browse. Kenia went up onto a rock boosting her height so as to be able to reach the greener branches higher up in the trees. She then followed the others to the baobab water hole, where they had a lot of fun playing mud bathing games following their afternoon milk bottle.

The Two Latest Photos of GODOMA: (view gallery of pictures for GODOMA)

 Godoma near Lasayen Godoma browsing
Godoma near Lasayen
photo taken on 9/25/2015
Godoma browsing
photo taken on 9/17/2015

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: GODOMA (foster now)


Early morning on the 14th of August, Conservancy Scouts from the Taita Hills Sanctuary, a private Conservancy of 28,000 acres at the foot of the Taita Hills Mountains adjacent to Tsavo West National Park, came across a tiny elephant calf trapped in a steep sided watering point. The calf was bruised and battered from her obviously life threatening struggle but the scouts immediately came to her aid, retrieving her from the water and releasing her in the hope that her mother and herd might return for her.



The calf was still milk dependent, only a couple of months old, and cut a desperately vulnerable figure as she trailed a herd of zebra and three buffalo on the open plains. She was kept under observation for most of the day but there were no other elephants in the area, and how long she had been trapped for was unclear, so whilst there was still time to mount a rescue the DSWT elephant Keepers from Voi were contacted. The sanctuary is situated 1˝ hour’s drive from our Voi rehabilitation unit and the men wasted no time getting to the site with much needed milk formula and some daylight in hand.

The orphaned calf  Capturing the calf

The calf is captured  The orphaned calf is given some milk

Preparing the calf for transport to the airstrip  The Voi keepers waiting at the airstrip

The rescue plane and Nursery keepers arrive  The keepers quickly greet each other

A keeper looking at the calf's injuries  The calf in the back of the pickup

Strapping the calf  The calf is strapped for the flight to Nairobi

The young calf given some loving attention  Carrying the calf to the plane

The calf loaded in the plane  On a drip on the way back


Simultaneously a rescue aircraft was mobilized from Nairobi and our Nursery Keepers prepared the necessary rescue paraphernalia. The two teams met at the Taita airfield and handed over their precious cargo. The female calf was carefully prepared for her flight with an intravenous drip inserted into her ear vein before take off. It was close to nightfall by the time she arrived at the Nairobi Nursery with a carefully prepared stable awaiting her arrival. She cried much of the night, missing her lost family enormously but with the reassuring company of the rest of the Nursery orphans along with loving tender attention from her keepers she eventually settled. We have called her Godoma, the name of the valley close to where she was rescued, and we estimate she was about five to six months old on arrival.

In the stable after arrival  The calf is called Godoma

All the orphans want to greet Godoma  Climbing over a tree branch

Surrounded by the Nursery herd on her first day out  Godoma near Lasayen

Godoma in the forest with the others  Godoma followed by Sokotei

Godoma out in the bush with the other orphans  Sweet Godoma

Godoma having milk  Godoma at the mudbath


While Godoma, despite her injuries, did well physically, she has missed her lost family terribly and has taken a long time to settle and comfortably integrate into the Nursery herd. She has been shy and reserved, remaining on the fringes of the group, but with the resident orphans giving her constant attention we have watched her change and grow more comfortable. In the beginning the first stable we placed her in caused her great anxiety. She felt claustrophobic, but when we changed her stable and placed her in one with a higher roof and more space, Mwashoti’s stable, she was instantly more comfortable. Thankfully mellow Mwashoti had no problem with the stable change.

In the stockade  Godoma on her own

Godoma browsing  Godoma greeting a keeper

Godoma playing with a blanket  Godoma

Godoma greeted by Balguda  Godoma following the others

Godoma on her first day out

   

Please see the resources above for more information on GODOMA

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