THE MERU MOBILE VETERINARY UNIT
REPORT FOR - August 2016

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EASTERN CONSERVATION AREA VETERINARY UNIT MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 2016

Summary

This report describes activities of the Meru veterinary unit in August 2016. During this month the Unit were away on annual leave hence some of the cases were attended by the Sky Vet Unit.  

The Meru Vet treated an elephant for an abscess on its flank and offered advice to Ol pejeta Conservancy regarding a black rhino who was reported to have suffered from minor rectal tear.

We would like to thank Dr. Fred Ochieng from KWS headquarters for standing in while we were away. This was made possible through the DSWT Sky Vet program.

CASE#1 SICK BLACK RHINO IN OL PEJETA CONSERVANCY

Date: 27th August 2016

Species: Black rhino

Sex: Male

Age:  Adult

Location: Ol Pejeta Conservancy

History and Advice

A black rhino was reported to have passed blood during defecation. This happened on three occasions although it showed normal behavior and good appetite. A minor rectal tear of unknown etiology was suspected. Following discussions with the rhino monitoring team, we recommended further observation of this animal. Two days later it was reported that no more blood was seen in stool.

CASE#2 ABSCESS IN AN ELEPHANT

Date: 30th August 2016

Species: Elephant

Sex: Male

Age:  Adult

Location: Meru national park

History

This elephant was found during a patrol in the park. It had pus oozing from a swelling in the abdominal flank. This elephant was darted for examination and treatment.

This elephant was seen with an abscess  The elephant is darted for treatment

Immobilization, examination and treatment

Immobilization was achieved using Etorphine hydrochloride 18mg in a single 3cc Dan-Inject dart with a 2.2 × 60 mm needle. Darting was done from a vehicle with the dart placed into the gluteal muscles. After 10 minutes this elephant went into left lateral recumbence.

The abscess discharging pus  

Examination showed an open abscess. Debridement of the abscess was carried out to remove pus and necrotic tissue using hydrogen peroxide and iodine. Green clay was then applied and a systemic antibiotic was injected to prevent spread of infection.

The wound is cleaned and pus removed  Green clay is packed into the wound

Prognosis   

This animal will make a full recovery in the coming days.

The elephant moves off  The elephant on his feet after treatment

CASE#3 REMOVAL OF A LION COLLAR

Date: 31/08/2016

Species: Lion

Sex: Female

Age:  Adult

Location: Lewa conservancy

History

A female lion in Lewa conservancy was immobilized to remove a tracking collar which had malfunctioned. The lioness was also treated for lameness on its right forelimb.

Immobilization, collar removal and treatment

The lioness was darted using a combination of Ketamine hydrochloride and Medetomidine Hcl from a vehicle with the dart placed into the shoulder muscles. Down time was 6 minutes.

A blindfold was applied and the lion moved to a shade for examination and collar removal.

The lionness is darted to remove the collar

The lion also had a wound on the medial claw of the right forelimb. The hair was clipped from around the wound so it could be cleaned. Povidone iodine and topical antibiotic spray were also applied.

Reversal

Antisedan was injected intramuscularly 45 minutes after sedation to reverse the effects of medetomidine Hcl. Ten minutes later the lioness came around.

 

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