The Amboseli Mobile Veterinary Unit

Field Report - April 2016

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MONTHLY REPORT - VETERINARY CLINICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR THE SOUTHERN CONSERVATION AREA (MVU) – APRIL 2016

Report by; Dr. Michael Njoroge

INTRODUCTION

The SCA mobile Vet Unit was faced with a reduced number of cases within the ecosystem attributed to the rains within the area.

  

CASE#1 TREATMENT OF A SPEARED ELEPHANT

Date:  21st April 2016

Species: Elephant

Sex: Male

Age: 17 yrs

Location: Amboseli National Park

History

This male was spotted whilst searching for a reported injured elephant which had been treated earlier. It had a fairly large swelling on the left fore limb and a spear injury to the right hip. He was also severely limping.

Immobilization, examination and treatment

The bull was immobilized with 16mg EtorphineHcl in a 3 ml Dan - inject dart using the Dan Inject system from a vehicle.

This elephant requires treatment for two injuries  The elephant is darted for treatment

After 10 minutes, the bull went recumbent but on the left side and was thus flipped over for thorough examination and treatment. The trunk was maintained patent using a piece of stick placed across the nostril entrances. The temperature was high hence plenty of water was doused on the elephant to keep the body temperatures low.  The ears were used as blindfold.

A vehicle is used to flip the elephant  The elephant on the other side

On physical examination the elephant the left forelimb was swollen but no physical injury could be seen. The wound to the hip was most likely inflicted by a spear but had healed with time. It was suspected that the swelling could have been caused by trauma. The elephant was injected with 100 ml Betamox L.A and 100 ml Flunixine meglumine at different sites intramuscularly. The entire operation lasted about 20 minutes.

Assessing the wounds  The vet prepares the medicine needed

Reversal

The anesthetic was reversed using 48mg Diprenorphine Hydrochloride. The elephant took 4 minutes to get up and walk away from the site.

The elephant recovers from the anaesthetic quickly  The elephant moves off after a successful treatment

Prognosis

Good

 CASE#2 RESCUE OF ELEPHANT AT AMBOSELI

Date:  23rd April 2016

Species: Elephant

Sex: Male

Age: Infant (4 months)

Location: Amboseli National Park

History

A young elephant was reported abandoned in Amboseli ecosystem in a swampy wet area around Risa village by big life rangers. The mother could not be traced hence reunion was impossible. A decision was made to relocate him the DSWT stockade at Nairobi National park for care and nurturing.

Rescue

As this was a young elephant he was easily captured using physical restraints. Using a land cruiser the young elephant was relocated to a safe, warm holding ground awaiting relocation to Nairobi. The DSWT arranged for a chattered aircraft tio relocate the elephant to the Nairobi stockade.

This little elephant is too young to survive without mothers milk  The DSWT Keepers arrive

The elephant was collected early on the morning hours of 24-4-16 and airlifted to Nairobi.

Receiving milk before his journey to Nairobi  Strapped on the plane for his journey

Prognosis

The elephant is in good health and chances of survival are high

CASE#3 HUMAN WILDLIFE CONFLICT – AARDVARK ROAD ACCIDENT

Date:  24th April 2016

Species: Aardvark

Sex: Male

Age: Adult

Location: Amboseli-Kimana gate road, Amboseli Ecosystem

History

A male aardvark was spotted by the veterinary team while on their normal routine patrol. It is likely to have been hit by a car on road in the early morning hours.

Case Management

The aardvark was recumbent and immobile hence immobilization was not necessary for examination and assessment.

On physical examination the aardvark had suffered from compound fractures to the hind limbs and left forelimb, as well as head and spinal injury. A decision to euthanize the aardvark was made since no successful clinical intervention could be done.

Unfortunately his injuries were too severe  This aardvark was hit by a car

The Southern Conservation Area Mobile Veterinary Unit is grateful to all individuals and organisations that played a role in assisting us towards achieving our goal. Many thanks to The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, The Samuel J and Ethel Lefrak charitable trust and The Kenya Wildlife Service for their continued support to this unit which aims at immediate response to clinical intervention, wildlife rescues and alleviating wildlife suffering. Many thanks to the TCA mobile veterinary unit and the Sky vet for holding brief while we were away.