Our Herd of Hope

Visit our Herd of Hope

Our Herd of Hope is a family of 21 life-sized bronze elephants embarking on the journey of a lifetime as they migrate across London. Leading the herd is our matriarch, symbolic of the mother and family each of the infant elephants, in the care of the Sheldrick Trust, lost when they became orphaned. She represents our Keepers, our team and you, our wider family who help to give these elephants a second chance at life. 

Each smaller elephant represents our real-life herd, from loyal Maisha through to brave Sattao. Despite the many life-threatening difficulties that they have faced, including poaching, human-wildlife conflict and natural disaster, we have helped them survive and thrive, and the compassion, caring and joyful nature of these individuals is an inspiration to us. In honour of each of our orphans and their individual stories, we are privileged to share these sculptures with you so that even if you can’t visit us in East Africa, you have another opportunity to join our herd.


Created by internationally acclaimed artists Gillie and Marc, the sculptures aim to raise funds and awareness for this next generation of elephants who will grow up into the healthy, supported and loved elephants of tomorrow thanks to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and our supporters.

Help us to share our message of hope by tagging us on social media at #herdofhope 


Now in Spitalfields Market. Entry is free

From the plains of Kenya to the heart of London, our sculpture ‘herd’ are now making their way through the iconic Spitalfields Market. Our herd first arrived in London in December 2019, taking up residence in Marble Arch. After a year of sharing their stories with visitors, they have migrated across the city to enjoy a new habitat and engage even more people.

Walk amongst our 21 life-sized bronze elephants and get to know the real-life orphans that have inspired this installation. There are 20 orphan elephants in total, each featuring the name of the elephant they symbolise along with a scannable QR code allowing you to watch their rescue videos and directly support their rehabilitation journey.


Map location of our Herd of Hope.


Meet our Herd of Hope

Unable to visit? We know that during the COVID-19 crisis, not everyone will be able to physically visit our herd so we have created a virtual walkthrough tour so that you can join the calves on their journey from the comfort of your own home!

The Artists - Gillie and Marc

The exceptional Gillie and Marc create some of the world’s most innovative public art, spreading messages of love, equality, and conservation around the world. Their highly coveted sculptures and paintings can be seen in art galleries and public sites in over 250 cities. They hope that The Orphans will bring the plight faced by elephants today to the forefront of people’s minds and hearts as they ask us to consider how our actions will affect their survival.

Hope for generations to come

Our bronze sculptures represent so much more than our current orphan elephants - they represent the future generations of wildlife that will grow as healthy, loved and supported animals thanks to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and your donations.

Without action, wild elephants could become extinct within our lifetime due to poaching, human-wildlife conflict and climate change. With your support, we’re saving their orphaned young and forging a future for the species. Every donation, small and large, will help us achieve our goal of protecting and conserving these beautiful creatures for decades to come.

Donate here

Miniature Bronze Collection

Gillie and Marc have created 25 limited edition miniature bronzes of each the orphan elephants represented in the life-size London installation. For every purchase, 50% will be donated to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust to further our work in the rescue, hand-raising and reintegration of elephants in Kenya. Resin sculptures, available in a range of colours, are also available, with 30% proceeds directed to the Orphans' Project.

Inspired by real-life orphaned elephants

Each of the 20 orphans in the Herd of Hope symbolises a real-life orphaned elephant in the care of the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, with their own unique personalities and rescue stories.

Enkesha

Enkesha nearly lost her trunk in a poacher’s snare. Emergency veterinary treatment saved her trunk and her life and she’s now being cared for at the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust’s Nairobi Nursery.

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Luggard

Barely able to walk after he was shot in the legs, vets determined the only way to save his life was a rescue and immediate, intensive care at the SWT Nairobi Nursery.

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Jotto

Swahili for heat, Jotto was found stuck in a well during the hottest month of the year. He would have surely died had he not been found by local herdsmen and brought to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.

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The Herd of Hope

The future of their species in the wild relies on this young generation being strong. Strength we can all help to provide.

Enkesha

Enkesha nearly lost her trunk in a poacher’s snare. Emergency veterinary treatment saved her trunk and her life and she’s now being cared for at the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust’s Nairobi Nursery.

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Luggard

Barely able to walk after he was shot in the legs, vets determined the only way to save his life was a rescue and immediate, intensive care at the SWT Nairobi Nursery.

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Jotto

Swahili for heat, Jotto was found stuck in a well during the hottest month of the year. He would have surely died had he not been found by local herdsmen and brought to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.

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Maisha

A victim of the climate crisis, Maisha was found collapsed near a water hole during a prolonged drought. It is likely she became separated from her herd after she became too weak to keep up with the search for food and water.

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Maktao

Maktao is a suspected orphan of human-wildlife conflict. He was starving and terribly dehydrated when he arrived at the Nursery, hungry for milk and fluids. He’s very rambunctious and will one day return to the wild when he is ready.

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Tagwa (right)

Rescued from the slopes of Mount Kenya, like other elephants from the area, this calf was covered in a protective blanket of dark fuzzy hair all over her body. She is a suspected orphan of human-wildlife conflict.

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Emoli (left)

A victim of the worsening climate crisis, Emoli was found alone, weak and starving along the Voi River. It is likely his mother died after becoming too weak to find food during a prolonged drought at the time.

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Musiara

Named after the Musiara swamp where he was found close to death, Musiara was so weak he collapsed several times at our Nursery and it was many days before his strength began to return.

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Ngilai

Ngilai had a tough start to life when he was found at the bottom of a well. He needed an immediate lifesaving drip and treatment for exhaustion, while Keepers tended to his cuts and scrapes.

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Ndotto

Ndotto was rescued by helicopter from the Ndoto Mountains when he was found following a herd of livestock. At the time of rescue, his umbilical cord was still fresh meaning he was only a new born.

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Mbegu

An orphan of human wildlife conflict, Mbegu was severely injured after she was attacked by humans. Thriving in the Trust’s care, she is a deeply maternal and loves to mollycoddle the younger orphans.

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Barsilinga

Vets were unable to save Barsilinga’s mother who was fatally injured by poachers. They brought her week old baby into the safe-keeping of the Trust, where he has grown up.

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Mwashoti

An innocent victim of poaching, Mwashoti was maimed by a snare which all but severed his leg. He made a miraculous recovery and is now living at our Umani Springs Reintegration Unit.

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Kiombo

Kiombo’s sunken cheeks were a clear sign to rescuers this baby elephant had been without his mother for some time. He settled into the Nursery seamlessly, as if understanding he had found a new family.

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Kiasa

Without her mother’s milk, this little six month orphaned elephant would have surely died. Rescuers flew her directly to the Trust’s Nursery in a helicopter where a warm stable and a bottle of milk awaited her.

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Ambo

An orphan from the Amboseli area, rescuers were unable to reunite this lone three month elephant with his herd. He joined the Trust’s orphan herd and is now living at one of the SWT’s reintegration Units.

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Malkia

Malkia’s mother was a well-known elephant who succumbed to the effects of old age, exacerbated by drought. In rescuing her milk dependent calf, Malkia was given a second chance at life.

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Sattao

Sattao is an orphan who was found alone in 2017, covered in bite marks from a predator attack and dreadfully thin. He was only three months at the time. He is now safe at the Nairobi Nursery and made a full recovery.

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A species under threat

Poaching and human-wildlife conflict claims the lives of up to 55 elephants a day. Gillie and Marc choose to colour the tusks of our elephant mother blue to draw attention to all the issues of elephant endangerment and to make people reconsider what tusks are now and what they will be in the future.

Learn more about elephants

Caring for Kenya's orphans

We are currently caring for 100 orphaned elephants, each with their own unique personality and story of rescue. All need specialist care and love to thrive, so they can enjoy a life in the wild when grown.
Adopt an orphan in our care

Our Partners

Support the #HerdOfHope

Your donation will ensure the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust can be there for elephants. Protecting those living wild and providing the rescue and rehabilitation for the babies left orphaned, so that they can return to a life in the wild when grown.

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