The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: BOROMOKO  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 BOROMOKO  Male  Wednesday, October 9, 2013 Boromoko - Mara Triangle  15 months old  Found wandering the plains of the Mara Conservancy  Suspected Poaching Victim 

Latest Updates on BOROMOKO:

View to Location map for BOROMOKO (opens a new window)

Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for BOROMOKO)

4/28/2018 - Mutara’s group and Laragai, Barsilinga, Kithaka, Garzi and Sirimon showed up in the morning. The group briefly settled for lucerne as they shared their night experiences. Kithaka and Lemoyian were showing a lot of interest in sticking close to the juniors and also the keepers; a behaviour which we are not used to seeing in them. They were very restless and apprehensive and we wondered what was wrong. Olsekki, Boromoko, Sokotei and Siangiki were missing from their group, but we suspect they are with Narok and Orwa. Enkikwe, who is on the road to recovery, joined the juniors and the ex-orphans outside and was welcomed by Suguta, Turkwel, and Kainuk who checked on his progress and left shortly after they were satisfied he was doing okay. Pare and Namalok waited in turns as they used one rock to scratch their bellies. Kanjoro had a light strength testing exercise with Garzi.

At around seven o'clock in the morning the day turned tragic when the decomposing body of Sokotei was found almost 2km south west of stockade. Sokotei was fleeing from lions that have become a threat to the existence of the young ex-orphans. Sokotei was fleeing back to the stockade for help and it appears Kithaka witnessed the incident since he is very frightened and is sticking close to the elephants and the keepers.

Mutara and her group appeared to have had a hint of what happened since they stayed with the juniors the whole day and gave comfort to Kithaka, Lemoyian, Barsilinga and Sirimon for losing one of their group members to lions. In the afternoon, the orphans settled to browse in Kanziku area and in the evening Kithaka was leading to make sure they spent the night in the stockade too; the stockade that he and his friends had decided to leave of their own will just a few months ago.

The Two Latest Photos of BOROMOKO: (view gallery of pictures for BOROMOKO)

 Sucking a keepers fingers Sweet Boromoko
Sucking a keepers fingers
photo taken on 2/3/2015
Sweet Boromoko
photo taken on 2/3/2015

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: BOROMOKO (foster now)


We received a call late on the 4th of January from Brian Heath, the Chief Executive of the Mara Conservancy, about an abandoned baby elephant who had been observed for a couple of days on the plains of the Mara. Numerous elephants were in the area, moving through but this baby bull was seemingly an orphan because he never successfully integrated. In this time he had not fed on any milk, and was very much peripheral to the herds, sometimes kilometers apart. The calf was left another day to see if anything changed and if his mother would return. There was a young female, too young to be his mother, who was clearly agitated and concerned about the little baby’s fate and she was torn between remaining with the herds, and providing protection for the baby. It was thought that maybe she could be the sister of the little bull.

The DSWT rescue team was eventually called on the 5th of January and alerted that the calf was losing condition, getting weaker as he had not fed in all this time, and if he were to remain unattended by the wild elephant herds he would fall prey to the predators. It was now obvious he was an orphan. The DSWT team flew to the Kichwa Tembo airstrip and was met and collected by Mara Conservancy Scouts and together with Brian Heath driven to the place the young calf still wandered the plains. On route to his location they passed plenty of hyenas and a pride of lions which highlighted the fact that he had survived the night was extremely lucky.

The rescue plane and pilot  The airstrip at Kichwa Tembo

Elephant herd  The orphaned calf

Negotiating the capture

As they drove up close to where he was they could see the young female who had been most concerned about him, but even she was quite a distance away by this time. As the team leapt from the car to capture the baby the second landrover was strategically positioned to protect the men just in case the young female decided to charge. The little baby put up little resistance and was restrained in minutes. He was clearly very weak by this time. He was lain down on the stretcher, strapped and placed in the back of the landrover and immediately driven to the airstrip to the waiting aircraft. There at the airstrip our Keepers attempted to hydrate him and he was then loaded into the plane and flown to Nairobi, a journey of just under one hour.

The calf is captured  The captured calf

The calf is restrained  In the pickup after capture

Heading back to the rescue plane  Loading the calf into the plane

The calf is loaded into the plane  The calf is placed on the drip

Loading the calf  During the flight

Offloading the calf at Wilson Airport  Driving back to the Nursery

He arrived in the Nursery late evening, a terribly sweet little calf of approximately 15 months old who settled down quickly, relieved to have the company of the others and milk. He was hooked on his milk bottle almost immediately and with his pale amber eyes was instantly recognizable. It was only a couple of days before he was out with the others. We have called him Boromoko after the area where he was rescued.

Arrival at the Nursery  The calf in the stockade

Removing the straps  The calf on its feet with the help of the keepers

The keepers get out of the way  The calf in the stockade soon after arrival

The calf is named Boromoko  Boromoko in his stockade before going out


Boromoko loves to linger with the visiting foster parents in the evening when coming home to his stable and has to be tempted by his milk bottle in order to proceed to his stable. He loves people and gravitates to the Keepers and the visitors. This is his unique little idiosyncrasy which of course endears him to everyone. The fate of his lost mother has not been confirmed, but there has been poaching reported in the Mara ecosystem in recent months. Boromoko is clearly relieved to be rescued and shows his appreciation daily.

Boromoko out in the bush with the other orphans  Boromoko attached to his keepers

Boromoko out in the field  Sucking a keepers fingers

Sweet Boromoko

   

Please see the resources above for more information on BOROMOKO

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