The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: MUNDUSI  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 MUNDUSI  Male  January 2016 Rombo Group Ranch  15 months old  Was seen alone and followed for three days before being rescued  Reason Unknown 

Latest Updates on MUNDUSI:

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Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for MUNDUSI)

7/30/2018 - Olareís group in the company of two junior wild elephants were present outside the stockade when the orphans were let out. Murka lay down to attract the young babies to come and play on her, but they didnít want to. Nine year old Kibo however saw a good opportunity to come and climb on her back! Rapa, Galla and Karisa walked down to the water trough to join a fifteen year old wild bull. The three dependent orphans stood there obviously admiring the boy, wishing they were his size to be able to defend themselves from their older friends. It wasn't clear what advice the teenager gave to the boys but we are sure he communicated something to them. Half an hour later, Olare escorted the juniors out to browse where Naisula played with Tumaren and Chemi Chemi tackled Kitirua. Enkikwe settled to browse with his friends Olsekki and Siangiki who are so good at taking care of him. Siangiki developed an itchy ear and used a nearby tree to scratch it. An hour later, Wanjala had the same problem and instead of scratching against a tree, he broke a piece of branch and used that to scratch with.

At mud bath, Sapalan used the smaller mud bath unlike the rest of his friends who walked to use the large one. As Sapalan was busy splashing water behind his ears, a warthog emerged from the bush and joined him to mud bath. At first, Sapalan wasn't sure how to react, but opened his ears out just in case as a warning to the warthog. This didnít seem to faze the pig however, who carried on with its bathing. Sapalan had no option other than to let the warthog carry on since he certainly didnít feel like chasing it, he is a very slow boy. Mundusi, who has watched and learnt how to climb on his age-mates from the older graduate orphans, decided to climb on Mteto in the water. Galla rode on Roi while Tusuja rode on Maramoja. All the naughty orphans take great delight on doing this in the water when it is a) easier to climb on their friends and b) when their friends canít retaliate! Later Tusuja engaged Olsekki in a strength testing exercise that went on for quite some time.

The Two Latest Photos of MUNDUSI: (view gallery of pictures for MUNDUSI)

 Mundusi dustbathing Mundusi
Mundusi dustbathing
photo taken on 8/29/2017
Mundusi
photo taken on 8/26/2017

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: MUNDUSI (foster now)


This young calf was first spotted alone on the 20th of March reported by the Masai community to the Kenya Wildlife Service and Big life Scouts. In the hope that he would find his natal herd again they decided to observe him from a distance for a few days to see if he would catch up with other elephants, before assuming he was an orphan. Sadly as the days passed he cut a very lonely figure, increasingly vulnerable to predators, and visibly losing condition.



After three days the decision was made to contact the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust to come to his rescue. Aerial support from the DSWT Airwing was called in to help find the calf that morning, and thankfully early in the morning of the 23rd of March we found the calf. It did not take long to spot him from the air, as he was the only elephant for miles, and the ground teams were guided in by radio. Being young the capture was straight forward as being weak he put up little resistance. He was driven by the Rombo Station Kenya Wildlife Service rangers to the closest airstrip in Ziwani, which is quite a lengthy drive in the back of a land cruiser.

The calf in the rescue vehicle  The calf in the rescue vehicle at the airstrip

Preparing to load the calf onto the plane  The calf inside the plane

In the meantime Angela Sheldrick had been informed of the rescue and plans had been put in place for a DSWT rescue team to depart from Nairobi in a Cessna Caravan, traveling the one hour flight to the Ziwani airstrip. On arrival they found the calf still recumbent in the back of a land cruiser, looking incredibly thin and dehydrated. The team took the precaution of immediately covering his eyes from the unforgiving sun, and placed him on a drip to help with his dehydrated condition before carefully loading him into the aircraft. As this was happening the team was again called by Angela this time with news that they would not be returning immediately to Nairobi with their casualty, but instead they would be flying onto the Voi airstrip located within Tsavo East National Park, this time to collect another young orphan just rescued after being first sighted by a tour driver. It was midday by the time the plane landed in Voi, and the newborn calf was already at the airstrip with DSWT Voi Keepers taking care of him. No time was wasted and he was immediately loaded into the back of the aircraft; now we had two orphaned elephants arranged in the back of the aircraft, each with a drip in place to help hydrate them throughout the journey. The team certainly had their hands full with two elephants on board for the flight back to base, and once there the unloading of their precious cargo required helping hands from various staff members within Wilson Airport, but thankfully everyone close to the plane was eager to help.

The two orphan calves in the rescue plane  The calf arrives at the Nursery

Preparing to offload the calf from the pickup  The calf is placed in the stockade

Helping the calf to its feet by the keeper  On its feet in the stockade

The calf on a drip in the stockade

Once back at the Nairobi Nursery the older calf was placed in a stockade, and his infant companion placed in a stable, both with attentive Keepers by their side. It was anticipated the older calf was approximately 15 months old and the reason for him being orphaned remains a mystery to this day as no carcass was ever reported. He fed well on milk, but was not initially interested in the freshly cut greens placed in his stockade. He soon settled into his new routine and began to relish the available food, and grew stronger with each passing day.

Enjoying greens  The calf is called Mundusi

Feeding on vegetation

With a little female called Mteto as his stockade neighbour he was able to draw great comfort from her presence and that of the other elephants when they surrounded him at night, communicating and comforting him with sounds not always audible to the human ear. We could visibly see him responding to their presence, settling down well and tolerating his Keeper, coming to take his milk bottle enthusiastically. During the day when the other orphans would leave for their days deep in the Nairobi National Park he became distressed, calling for them. With all the attention and comfort he received it was not long before we felt he had the strength and had grown tame enough to join the Nursery herd out in the bush during the day, and no longer needed to remain within the confines of his stockade; he was immediately embraced by the others, showered in elephant love and affection.

The calf greeting a keeper  Godoma greets Mundusi

Sweet Mundusi  Smelling the air

Wanjala and Mundusi  Rapa greets Mundusi

Mundusi is greeted by Malkia  Mundusi out in the fields

We have named this brave boy Mundusi, after the area from which he came, and he is a wonderfully calm little bull, who thankfully has settled in beautifully, and is now stout and very healthy with little plump cheeks.

Mundusi browsing  Mbegu and Mundusi

Mundusi having milk  Mundusi

Mundusi dustbathing  Mundusi pushing another orphan

   

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