Where we work

We work across Kenya to secure safe havens for wildlife

We not only work to protect elephants, but entire ecosystems and the diverse flora and fauna sustained in these places of stunning natural beauty

Where we work

We work to safeguard Kenya’s largest wildlife refuge, which encompasses Tsavo East and West National Parks and is home to Kenya’s largest elephant herds, numbering more than 12,000 individuals.

Location
Tsavo
Size
60,000 sq. km
Environment
Lava flows, comiphora woodland, savannah, swamps and lake Jipe.
Species
An abundance of wildlife including: Elephants, Black Rhino, Oryx, Gerenuk, Kudu, Zebra, Eland, Gazelles, Elephants, Buffalo, Lion, Leopard, Cheetah and Hirola (Hunter’s Hartebeest), and also more than 500 recorded species of bird.
Threats
Ivory and bush meat poaching, livestock incursions, charcoal burning and habitat loss and conflict over resources.
DSWT Projects
SWT/KWS Anti-Poaching Operations, SWT/KWS Mobile Vet Units, Aerial Surveillance, Orphans’ Project, Saving Habitats, Eco Lodges and Community Outreach.
History
David Sheldrick was the founding Warden of Tsavo National Park between 1949 and 1976. In that time he built Tsavo into a world famous Park known for its red-dusted elephants and diverse wildlife, for it is here that the Northern and Southern populations meet. Tsavo is home to Kenya's biggest elephant population, and while poaching tragically decimated the elephants in the 1980’s reducing numbers to just 6,000 the population has recovered to around 12,000 today, with the northern sector of the National Park seeing a resurgence in elephant numbers since 2004 thanks to the launch of our Ithumba Reintegration Unit, and the ongoing surveillance and protection afforded to this area once more.
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We work in Meru National Park, one of Kenya’s most unique and stunning Parks, to alleviate animal suffering and protect threatened wildlife, including endangered species, from human activities.

Location
Meru
Size
870 sq. km (roughly the same size as Maine in the USA)
Environment
Acacia woodland and grasslands. Forests in the West act as a vital water catchment system feeding 13 rivers that run through the Park.
Species
Home to abundant wildlife including the rare Grevy’s Zebra, Elephants, Black Rhino, White Rhino, Cheetah, Leopard, Lions, Buffalo, Hippos, Crocodiles and Reticulated Giraffe. There are also more than 427 recorded species of bird.
Threats
Ivory and Rhino Horn poaching and commercial bush meat poaching.
DSWT Projects
SWT/ KWS Meru Mobile Vet Unit, SWT/ KWS Meru Anti-Poaching Team, and Sheldrick Trust funded extension of electric fence for the Meru Rhino Sanctuary.
History
Founded in 1966 and made famous as the home of lioness, Elsa, Meru National Park is home to a mosaic of different habitats and varied landscapes with 13 permanent rivers running through the Park. At the peak of Meru’s popularity, close to 40,000 people visited the Park but in the late 1980s, intensive ivory poaching reduced the elephant population from 3,500 to just 210. After significant investment into the Park, several species including reticulated giraffe, Grevy’s zebra, impala, leopard and elephant were reintroduced. Within the Park also lies the Meru Rhino Sanctuary which now protects a population of over 80 white and black rhino.
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Set against the backdrop of Mount Kilimanjaro, we work in Amboseli National Park focusing on alleviating animal suffering in this unique ecosystem.

Location
Amboseli
Size
390 sq. km
Environment
Wetlands, savannah and woodlands.
Species
Home to abundant wildlife including Elephants, Cheetah, Giraffe, Lion, Zebra, Eland Wildebeest and Thompsons Gazelle. There are also more than 600 recorded species of bird.
Threats
Human-wildlife conflict, habitat destruction including deforestation and expanding agriculture and human settlements along with an increase in livestock numbers.
DSWT Projects
SWT/ KWS Amboseli Mobile Vet Unit, and Sheldrick Trust funds the lease for the Kimana Corridor and the Kimana Sanctuary.
History
Space and human-wildlife conflict are amongst the biggest challenges facing wildlife in the Amboseli ecosystem which lies close to the border of Tanzania and is dominated by Mount Kilimanjaro. Amboseli National Park houses five distinct habitats, including plains and swamps, and is known for its big elephant herds. Surrounded by six communally owned group ranches including Kimana Group Ranch and home to the Kimana Sanctuary, human-wildlife conflict, including crop raiding by elephants and predator attacks, is a major concern within the Amboseli ecosystem, which is famous for its iconic animals and incredible scenery.
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We work with local communities to protect Amu Ranch, a unique area of extraordinary biodiversity, to keep this stunning habitat and its wildlife protected for years to come.

Location
Lamu
Size
Over 100,000 acres
Environment
Mangroves, lowland forest and savannah woodlands.
Species
Home to abundant wildlife including the rare Ader’s Duiker, Elephant Shrew and Somali Galago. Also, Elephants, Giraffe, Lions, Cheetah. Leopards, Hippos and vast Buffalo and Coastal Topi and Zebra herds.
Threats
Human-wildlife conflict, illegal hunting, habitat destruction and the disruption of migratory patterns.
DSWT Projects
Saving Habitats,
History
The Lamu Conservation Area includes Amu Ranch, a 63,000sq acre area with some of the greatest biodiversity found on the content of Africa. It is also home to rare habitats and several critically and near endangered species. Local communities are becoming more and more involved in efforts to safeguard this biodiversity hotspot, led today by the Lamu Conservation Trust. Within the area also lies the Witu Co-Operative Ranch and the Witu Forest, an indigenous forest that forms part of an important elephant migratory corridor between the Dodori National Reserve, Amu Ranch and the Kipini Conservancy.
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Home to the world-famous wildebeest migration, we work in Mara National Reserve focusing on alleviating animal suffering.

Location
Masai Mara
Size
1,510 sq. km
Environment
Wetlands, savannah and woodlands.
Species
One of the worlds wonders the Masai Mara is home to 95 species of mammals including Elephants, Leopards, Buffalo, Wilderbeest, Zebras, Black Rhino, Thompsons Gazelle, Warthogs, Leopards, Lions, and Cheetahs.
Threats
Ivory poaching, increase in livestock, agricultural practices and fragmentation of wildlife habitats.
DSWT Projects
SWT/ KWS Mara Mobile Vet Unit, and Sheldrick Trust funded Security Support for the Mara Triangle.
History
Located in the Great Rift Valley and famed for its wildebeest migration, the Masai Mara is a complex ecosystem that supports a huge variety of wild animals. Made up of the Masai Mara National Reserve, Mara Triangle and community based conservancies; human-elephant conflict is an increasing issue, especially in areas of agriculture and cultivation.
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We protect the Kibwezi Forest and the nearby volcanic Chyulu Hills to safeguard this ancient ground water forest and the orphaned elephants that live here.

Location
Kibwezi Forest/ Chyulu Hills
Size
741 sq. km
Environment
Fresh water springs, forest, volcanic hills and lava flows.
Species
Home to a diverse range of animals which includes Buffalo, Leopard, Elephants, Rhino, Bushbuck, Bush Pig, Lesser Kudu, klipspringer, Mongoose, Duiker, Monkeys, Baboons, and Serval Cat, also a variety of insect, flora and birds.
Threats
Illegal logging, poaching, charcoal burning and untenable water extraction.
DSWT Projects
SWT/KWS Anti-Poaching Team, Orphans’ Project, Eco Lodges, Saving Habitats, Wild Border fence lines.
History
As one of just two existing groundwater forests in Kenya, the Kibwezi Forest is a rare and incredibly diverse habitat that is well known for its extensive variety of butterflies. In the past, years of human pressure had a profound impact on the forest’s flora and fauna, but in 2008 the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust secured a concession from the Kenya Forest Service to protect and manage the forest and immediately electrically fenced three boundaries with the fourth boundary open onto the Chyulu Hills National Park, and as a result the regeneration of vegetation within the forest and the increase in wildlife numbers has been significant.
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Home to several rare and endangered species, we work in the Mount Kenya ecosystem as part of our mission to save wild lives, both large and small.

Location
Mount Kenya
Size
715 sq. km
Environment
Snow-capped peaks, moorlands, alpine forest and mineral springs.
Species
Elephant, Leopard, Giant Forest Hog, Bongo, bushbuck and Buffalo, as well as other endemic, rare and threatened species.
Threats
Resource depletion including logging, bush meat poaching, forest fires and illegal water extraction.
DSWT Projects
SWT/KWS Mount Kenya Vet Unit, Sheldrick Trust funds KWS Rapid Response Anti-poaching Team, and the Mount Kenya Trust De-snaring Team
History
Created as a National Park in 1949, Mount Kenya National Park surrounds its namesake, and Africa’s second largest mountain Mount Kenya. Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997 this Park is one of Kenya's most important water towers and home to unique vegetation and species of special concern, but in recent years human activities have put pressure and tremendous threats on the ecosystem. A corridor provides a contiguous link from the lower lying foothills and more arid habitats to the forests of the mountain, enabling free movement of elephants and other wildlife,
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The Mau Forest, in the Rift Valley, is both the largest indigenous montane forest in East Africa and the largest drainage basin in Kenya, receiving some of the country’s highest rainfall. It is a priceless water catchment area for Kenya and the source of numerous rivers, including the Mara, Sondu and Njoro Rivers.

Location
Mau Forest
Size
675,000 hectares
Environment
Lush montane forest, water basin, source of multiple rivers
Species
The Mau is home to numerous wildlife species that include Elephants, Buffalos, Duikers, Bush Buck, Bongo, Giant Forest Hogs, and Leopards.
Threats
Logging, poaching, charcoal burning, and livestock grazing.
DSWT Projects
Sheldrick Wildlife Trust-funded De-Snaring Team, operated in collaboration with Mara Elephant Project
History
Found within the Rift Valley the Mau forest is Kenya's largest indigenous montane forest and most important water tower. It was declared Crown Land in the 1930s and made a National Reserve in 1945, then officially gazetted in 1954 as a Forest Reserve under the Forest Act.
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