The Meru Mobile Veterinary Unit in Action

The new Meru Mobile Veterinary Unit's area of operation covers a vast expanse of diverse habitats within the Northern and Coastal territories, home to a host of endangered and threatened species

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The new Meru Mobile Veterinary Unit's area of operation covers a vast expanse of diverse habitats within the Northern and Coastal territories, home to a host of endangered and threatened species.

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In the Unit's first launching week, having already treated a white rhino in Meru, the newly formed team has been travelling throughout these remote habitats meeting and introducing the unit to the Kenya Wildlife Service teams, local communities, tourism lodges and other conservation bodies. It is incredibly important for this unit to work together with the greater communities of the area in order to receive wildlife reports and take action immediately to improve the animals chance of survival.

One of the journeys Dr Rono and his team have made is into the depths of Kora National Park, which borders both Meru National Park and Mwingi National Reserve. Kora, the legendary home of George Adamson and his lion reintegration program, spans 1,700km2 of semi-arid lands incorporating dense bush and the mighty Tana River. Once an area rich in wildlife, especially the African elephant, Kora has been victim to persistent poaching and livestock intrusion, leaving only a handful of elephants left behind, most of which are young herds who have lost their big bulls and matriarchs to poachers of the ivory trade.
During the week more reports of injured animals started to come in, including a snared lion, injured buffalo, a cheetah with a fractured leg and a wounded elephant in the far north, so the team covered vast distances by road, taking the opportunity to also visit the areas they will be covering, familiarising themselves with the landscapes, roads and environments, whilst meeting the people who work in the field, visiting Lewa Conservancy, Ol Pejeta Ranch, Solio Ranch, the Aberdares National Park, Shaba and Samburu National Reserves as well as all Kenya Wildlife Service stations throughout the area.
Working within a remote area covering over 10,000km2 requires dedication, patience and endurance to cope with the challenges of the rough terrain and harsh climate, whilst the team needs perseverance in order to track and treat any injured wild animals residing within these habitats, which can take many attempts.
The DSWT is proud and excited to have this opportunity and to work hand in hand with the Kenya Wildlife Service in giving wildlife a second chance. You can donate directly to our mobile veterinary units by following this link https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org/is/donate_now.asp and selecting mobile veterinary units from the drop-down menu. We rely on your support.