The following is information on the Elephant Orphan named: SITIES  (foster now)

Name Gender Date Born Location Found Age on Arrival Comments Reason for being Orphaned
 SITIES  Female  Monday, January 11, 2010 Mgeno Ranch  Approximately seven weeks  She walked into the headquarters of Mgeno Ranch desperately seeking company  Poaching 

Latest Updates on SITIES:

View to Location map for SITIES (opens a new window)

Most Recent Keeper's Diary Entry: (view all the latest entries for SITIES)

6/24/2018 - This morning the dependent orphan found Mutarasís group including Suguta, Turkwel, Kainuk, Sities and Kanjoro. Nasalotís herd were also there including Loijuk, Sidai, Zurura, Chyulu, Ishanga, Bongo and Nasalotís baby Nusu, with one wild female in the group too. They stayed for a short time and left. The dependent orphans enjoyed the lucerne after the ex-orphans had gone. Nusu was in a very playful mood but also felt shy with the keepers. Esampu, Kamok and Sapalan were feeding on the Lucerne together.

In the bush Mundusi and Mteto were browsing together while Namalok was separate from others. Later on Mundusi went to communicate with Wanjala and they started browsing. The new three new babies then went to browse with Karisa who they like and remember from the Nursery. Karisa scratched his neck on a nearby stump. The orphans then walked to mud bath for their midday milk bottle.

All the orphans had their bottles and walked straight to the water trough to drink water. Nasalotís herd then arrived and they interacted and wallowed together, before getting out and walking to the dust bath. Wild born baby Nusu was the most playful one on the pile of loose soil, while Zurura and Kasigau were the most playful ones in the water hole. They just love swimming at the moment and playing their pushing games in the water! After the shared dust bath the ex-orphans walked away in separate direction to the dependent orphans who went back out to browse.

Mundusi and Mteto were together the whole of the afternoon, but Esampu seemed to be exploring new friends. Naseku, Wanjala and Karisa were browsing together. While Siangiki and Olsekki as usual stuck together. Wanjala and Karisa are very close friends, and today Tusuja also seemed to be trying to make friends with Wanjala.

In the afternoon the orphans walked back to the stockades for the night. An hour later Laragai, Barsilinga, Kithaka, Lemoyian, Garzi and Sirimon arrived back too and they were shut into their stockade.

The Two Latest Photos of SITIES: (view gallery of pictures for SITIES)

 Sities close to her Keepers Sities enjoys a dust bath
Sities close to her Keepers
photo taken on 3/24/2010
Sities enjoys a dust bath
photo taken on 3/24/2010

ORPHAN PROFILE FOR: SITIES (foster now)


An unusual visitor walked into the Mgeno Ranch Headquarters, within the Tsavo Conservation Area during the morning of 22nd March 2010. This unusual visitor was a bellowing baby elephant, desperate for company and who sent all the Staff scuttling for safety, fearful that the babyís mother might turn up to claim it. Eventually they ventured out, their sudden appearance frightening the little calf, who ran off a short distance, but then returned, desperate for company. Too young to know fear, being only about 1 Ĺ months old, the Staff tied it to a tree, and then called Dr. David Ndeereh of the Trustís Tsavo Mobile Veterinary Unit, who in turn alerted our Voi Elephant Keepers that an elephant rescue was needed.

Our Voi team meet the tiny surprise arrival at Mgeno Ranch headquarters  The calf willingly takes milk from Stephen

The orphaned calf rescued by our team at Mgeno Ranch  The young calf at the Mgeno headquarters with our Voi Keepers



It is suspected that this baby is a poaching victim, although human/wildlife conflict cannot be ruled out since the Ranch has a lot of livestock and herdsmen. The Trustís De-Snaring anti-poaching team has been sent to scour the area to confirm any evidence of possible poaching.

The calf, a beautiful female calf, responded well to the arrival of the Keepers who fed her a bottle of milk and rehydration water before loading her into their Pickup and driving it to the Voi Stockades. Once there she remained close to the Keepers following them around, until the Rescue Plane arrived from Nairobi to airlift her back to the Trustís Nairobi Elephant Nursery.

Baby and staff on the Voi airfield  On the airfield and being prepared for the flight.jpg

While on the plane Hassan blows comfortingly into the little calf's trunk.jpg  Sities and Hassan on the plane flying back to Nairobi.jpg

The calf strapped and ready for the flight.jpg




The calf, who was originally named Mgeno to identify her origin, arrived in the Nursery on a very auspicious day Ė the day that CITES Cop 15 voted in favour of the elephants, prohibiting the requested sale of ivory stockpiles from both Tanzania and Zambia. In celebration of that event, we have named her Sities, pronounced the same but spelt differently. Although Kenyaís proposal that no other requests be made for the sale of ivory stockpiles for the 9 year resting period agreed at CITES Cop 14 was rejected, at least the elephants have a 3 year reprieve, before the battle begins again, and this surely must be better than nothing. This was a victory for Kenya who lobbied passionately against the sale of ivory stockpiles, as well as the work of all caring Conservationists, not least ourselves, who recognized that allowing Tanzania and Zambia to sell their ivory would simply further fuel the illegal poaching that has escalated sharply since the sale of the Southern African stockpiles. Furthermore, Tanzania and Zambia have been held responsible for the majority of poached elephants of late, massive ivory hauls seized en route to China identified through DNA as having come from elephants poached in Tanzaniaís Selous National Park and Zambiaís Niassa area.

The pickup arrives at the Trust's nursery  Angela, Sities and Mishack

Making new friends, Sities with Mutara.jpg  Sities was warmly greeted by Mutara


Sities meets the older orphans


The arrival of baby Sities in the Elephant Nursery brings to 21 the number of infants in our care in Nairobi. She was introduced to the 4 smallest Nursery members soon after arrival, and with them enjoyed a cooling dustbath in fresh red earth trucked in for their benefit, and playing in water splashed on the ground. She is in good health, feeding well, and overseen by Dida and Suguta, was at the noon mudbath hour, happily playing in a pile of loose red earth, and closely following the Keepers, just like all the others. We are delighted to welcome our little SITIES into the fold, on the day that CITES, for once, voted in favour of the elephants!

Sities enjoys a dust bath  Playing with the red earth, Hassan and the other Keepers


Sities close to her Keepers  Sities


   

Please see the resources above for more information on SITIES

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